Swimmer uses a subwing to swim and dive with ‘celebrity’ wild dolphin

Swimmer keeps up with a dolphin while being towed by a boat in stunning underwater footage

  • The wild Atlantic dolphin follows this diver in Turks and Caicos Islands’ waters 
  • The swimmer ‘flies’ through the blue water with the aid of a subwing
  • The device was invented when Norwegian Simon Sivertsen was a teenager 

This is the amazing moment a ‘celebrity’ Bottlenose dolphin swims alongside an adrenaline junkie as he dives underwater using a subwing.

The wild Atlantic dolphin, known as JoJo, follows this swimmer as he ‘flies’ through the crystal clear waters of the Turks and Caicos Islands with the aid of a subwing.

The device can be bent and manoeuvred to bring the diver closer to the surface or drag them deep underwater. They can move left and right and even flip around.

Invented by Norwegian teenager Simon Sivertsen while bored on a family holiday in 2010, the subwing is used to ‘fly’ through the water.

The wild Atlantic dolphin, known as JoJo, follows this swimmer as he ‘flies’ through the crystal clear waters of the Turks and Caicos Islands with the aid of a subwing

He told Total Prestige Magazine: ‘The idea first came to mind when I was sailing in the Mediterranean. 

‘The water was unbelievably clear, so it felt almost like flying when swimming underwater. 

‘However, swimming underwater was lacking any sensation of thrill. 

‘Also, I wanted to be able to glide through the water effortlessly and at a higher speed than I was able to achieve with my diving fins.’

A caption on the video, which was uploaded to Facebook, reads: ‘Watch Jojo the Dolphin join us for a subwing session. 

‘We’re so stoked to share this incredible footage with you.’

JoJo has become one of the islands’ ‘most famous residents’, according to the post.

A caption on the video, which was uploaded to Facebook, reads: ‘Watch Jojo the Dolphin join us for a subwing session’

Grabbing hold of both wings he then turns around in the water by pulling one side up and pushing the other down simultaneously

As the diver is pulled through the water by a motor boat the dolphin stays close by his side.

At one point the swimmer even reaches out to try to touch the mammal while only holding on to the subwing with one hand.

Grabbing hold of both wings he then turns around in the water by pulling one side up and pushing the other down simultaneously.

How does a subwing work and why is it so popular? 

The Subwing consists of two separate wings connected in a rotatable swivel.

By grabbing the grip on each wing, it can easily be controlled in all directions.

Users can tilt both wings downwards to dive, and upwards to resurface, while if attempting a roll, a person twists the wings in opposite directions.

The company says that controlling the Subwing is easy to learn and comes naturally to many first-timers.

Water is about 800 times denser than air and therefore high speeds are not necessary to achieve what feels like a fast speed under water.

The company recommends a towing speed around 2-4 knots, (2.3mph to 4.6mph) which can be achieved by a boat with a small motor. 

Simon Siverton, the inventor of Subwing, passing through a school of Tuna fish

Subwing is an incredible sport that has reinvented the way you can experience the ocean, where riders are towed behind a boat and have the ability to spin, turn and dive almost anywhere, Director of Subwing, Mats Westgård has previously said.

‘Riding the Subwing will make you feel like you’re flying underwater and gives the rider a sense of dolphin-like freedom,’ he said. 

Source: Read Full Article